Why is the FBI Merging Criminal & Civil Fingerprints into a Single Database?


Talk about 1984. While employers and others have been fingerprinting people for decades, even though they weren’t criminals, the Federal Bureau of Investigations apparently weren’t interested in that particular data. Now they are, and I’m pretty sure, it’s unconstitutional.

Jennifer Lynch at the Electronic Frontier Foundation reports:

Being a job seeker isn’t a crime. But the FBI has made a big change in how it deals with fingerprints that might make it seem that way. For the first time, fingerprints and biographical information sent to the FBI for a background check will be stored and searched right along with fingerprints taken for criminal purposes.

The change, which the FBI revealed quietly in a February 2015 Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA), means that if you ever have your fingerprints taken for licensing or for a background check, they will most likely end up living indefinitely in the FBI’s NGI database. They’ll be searched thousands of times a day by law enforcement agencies across the country—even if your prints didn’t match any criminal records when they were first submitted to the system.

Read more at FreedomOutpost

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