Of course Blacks, honest and dishonest, can celebrate Groundhog Day if they choose; however, they should know what they are celebrating. Ron Everett, the founder of Kwanzaa, has conned academia, the media, a small segment of Americans and a substantial number of Blacks. Ron was born in Parsonsburg, Maryland, the fourteenth child in the family. His father was a tenant farmer and Baptist minister. Everett moved to Los Angeles in 1959, joining his older brother who was a teacher there.

During this period he took the name Karenga (Swahili for “keeper of tradition”) and the title Maulana (Swahili-Arabic for “master teacher”). It seems humility is not one of the principles of Kwanzaa’s founder.

Following the Watts Riots in 1965, Karenga (Ron Everett) organized US or United Slaves that meant “US black people” and he gave credit to Malcolm X’s Afro-American Unity program as an influence for his group’s existence. Their silly motto is “Anywhere we are, Us is.”

During the early years of Kwanzaa, Karenga said that it was meant to be an “oppositional alternative” to Christmas (gift giving) and Judaism (using a seven branch candle-holder that evokes Judaism’s menorah); however, as it became more popular it has morphed into a special day for Blacks–non-thinking Blacks. The holiday begins Dec. 26 until Jan. 1 and the celebrations often include songs and dances, storytelling, poetry reading, and a large meal. On each of the seven nights, the family gathers and a child lights one of the candles on a candleholder, followed by discussion of one of the seven principles.

Continues on BarbWire

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