Revolutionary Pulpits: The Last Hope Of A Dying Republic

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Christian teachings were the seed-thoughts of our political constitutions, and Christian evangelism was the inspiration of American colonization. If we eliminate from our national history the direct and all-powerful influence of the Christian religion, we have nothing left but a set of disjointed facts without significance, dry and dreary annals without parentage or posterity. But on the other hand, a right apprehension of all the formative forces in our national life will vindicate the matured judgment of Emerson, that ‘our whole history appears like a last effort of Divine Providence in behalf of the human race.’ (Bishop Charles Galloway, Christianity and the American Commonwealth, 1898)

The greatest threat to any civilization is abandonment of God’s moral standard, for He adjudicates the bounds and duration of their existence by His immutable nature, which is on display, day after day, and night after night, in His handiwork.

Until recent decades, the American pulpit embraced a revolutionary purpose as curator and exponent of the “whole counsel of God,” resulting in a ubiquitous, healthy fear of God among the American people. Colonial ministers were chief advocates of the political ideology embodied in our nation’s Founding Charters. The historical evidence is irrefutable: the colonial pulpit, set ablaze by the Great Awakening, became the Foundry of America’s Charters of Freedom. Modern historians have confirmed that the rights asserted in our Founding Charters were preached from colonial pulpits in the fifteen years that culminated in the Battle of Lexington. The clergy were not just spectators that cheered from the sideline of the Rebellion. They stood out among chief agitators of the Revolution, and after it began, among the most successful in keeping revolutionary ardor alive, both from the pulpit and on the battlefield.

Today’s Pulpit, however, has forgotten its legacy and largely abandoned the inconvenient truths of Scripture that engender the fear of God and behavior that is conducive to Liberty, opting instead for market-driven “messaging” that scratches itching ears, and anesthetizes consciences. Much of that which passes for Bible-based preaching today is devoid of power to convince hearts of sin and restore broken lives. In the quest for a more palatable way to maintain attendance and charitable revenue, American pulpits are unwittingly “hewing out cisterns” (Jeremiah 2:13) that cannot retain an enduring move of the Holy Spirit, and produce washed-out salt in the pew, that Jesus warned would be “good for nothing” but road salt, to be “tossed out and trodden underfoot of men.”

God’s people need to learn what it means to be “the salt of the earth.” (Matthew 5:13) When Jesus spoke of salt losing its saltiness, He was not referring to the reticence of some to preach the gospel, or the flavor-enhancing qualities of table salt. He was talking about the vital curative and preservative characteristics of salt and His intent that it infuse the warp and woof of its temporal sojourn, including, but not limited to civil government.
Continues on BarbWire

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