Racial Conflagration is Obama’s Enduring Legacy

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As President Obama prepares to make his merciful exit from office, he’s taken time to tell a Chicago reporter that race relations have improved on his watch. He spoke these words in the same city where four young blacks recently kidnapped and tortured a mentally retarded white man while shouting “F*ck white people!” and “F*ck Donald Trump!” as they livestreamed the whole thing on Facebook. And Obama did all of this with a straight face.

“The good news is that the next generation that’s coming behind us … have smarter, better, more thoughtful attitudes about race,” said the failed president. What he means by this is that an entire multiracial generation of Americans has been raised on lessons about white privilege and minority victimhood. They’ve internalized this ideology so completely that they simply can’t interact with people who don’t share it.

Barack Obama’s historic presidency was supposed to unite us. I don’t think his “failure” to do so was an accident. He spent eight years agitating just like his hero Saul Alinsky and his mentor Frank Marshall Davis did. The results were predictable — anger, chaos, and violence. Cops have been murdered, neighborhoods have been torched, and innocent people have had their lives ruined. Before Barack Obama came along, we were making progress in this country toward demoting race to a nonissue. Now it’s the issue, the all-consuming concern that supersedes all others. Race is everything and everything is racial. And it’s killing our nation.

President Obama’s remarks remind me of a creeping feeling I’ve had of late that I write entirely too many columns about race. It wasn’t always this way. Back when I was in college I made a name for myself on the staff of the student newspaper as a rabid “anti-choice” activist because I wrote regularly about our on-going baby holocaust. These days I rarely address the subject and I feel a little guilty about it. Planned Parenthood is still running its Murder, Inc., so why am I not writing more about it?

The answer is that I, like too many other conservatives, play defense. I respond to what’s happening in the political realm. In my college years I wrote so much about the evils of the abortion industry because race was not nearly as front-and-center an issue as it is now. These days, with so much emphasis on race, I feel compelled to respond to the all the idiocy that people spout about “white privilege” and our poor, maligned president who just can’t catch a break because no black man can in this horrible, racist country. I want to point out that white-on-black crime is exceedingly rare, that no one cares when cops shoot white people, and that the Department of Justice does not dispense equal justice under the law but instead prefers blacks above all others.

And yet here I am writing another column about race. It’s very difficult to write about anything else when every issue has been racialized. Race and racism are inescapable.

There isn’t a word, thought, deed, symbol, piece of legislation, or news item that cannot be imbued with a racial angle when there’s a determined race hustler around.

Gun control? You betcha. Michael Moore, producer of the anti-Second Amendment “Bowling for Columbine,” racialized that issue in 2012. Said Moore:

We’ve got over a quarter-billion guns in people’s homes. And they’re mostly in the suburbs and rural areas where there is virtually no crime and no murder. So why is that? What are they really afraid of? What do they think of — who’s going to break into the house? Do they think it’s little freckled-face Jimmy down the street? I don’t think so. I don’t think that’s who they’re afraid of. And it cuts down to the heart of our race problem that we still haven’t resolved.

Moore’s argument is self-defeating. For starters, he’s essentially admitting the validity of the “more guns less crime” argument advanced by John Lott in his book by the same name.

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